Multimedia Learning Objects in the Humanities: Developing a New Model

By:
Ms Caroline Leitch-Thompson,
Miss Brooklin Schneider
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Already commonly used in the sciences, interactive multimedia learning objects are becoming increasingly popular with humanities educators. However, the needs and motivations of students in the sciences are not always the same as those of students in the humanities. Too often, designers fail to take these differences into account when creating a learning object for the humanities. The result is a teaching tool that attempts to entertain but fails to meet its educational objectives.

Based on their experience designing an interactive learning object to be used by students of English Literature, and with reference to Richard E. Mayer and Mark Edmundson, the authors discuss the limitations of the traditional learning object paradigm. This traditional model favours a games-based style of interaction that facilitates knowledge acquisition by providing students with external motivation to master the subject matter. When used to create learning objects for the humanities, this model often fails because it does not help students achieve the higher-order learning objectives in Bloom's taxonomy such as application, analysis, and synthesis. The authors argue that digital media can be used effectively in the humanities but only if humanities educators develop their own distinct model for interactive teaching tools. This model must be one that is discipline appropriate and that recognizes intrinsic motivation in students.


Keywords: Learning, Teaching, Multimedia Learning Objects, Interactivity, Digital Humanities
Stream: Technology in Education
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
Paper: Multimedia Learning Objects in the Humanities


Ms Caroline Leitch-Thompson

Student, Department of English Language and Literature, Rhetoric and Professional Writing Program, University of Waterloo
Canada


Miss Brooklin Schneider

Student, Department of English Language and Literature, Rhetoric and Professional Writing Program, University of Waterloo
Canada


Ref: T05P0127