The Composition of Nature: Nature, Photographic Technology and Resolutions of the Real

By:
Dr Rob Bartram
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This paper explores the recent convergence of nature and technology, both in the realms of social theory, and in the practices and performances of nature. In attempting to divert attention away from the Cartesian tendencies to separate and differentiate nature from technology, this paper argues that a new nature aesthetic has emerged that can be explained as functioning with and as technology, rather as a function of technology. The paper poses two main questions: how has the convergence of nature and technology taken place?; what are the cultural capacities of nature-technology? Following the work of Baudrillard, Deleuze and Virilio, the paper suggests that nature and technology conflate in a mutual pursuit of instantaneous modes of production, greater image and object resolution, and more adaptable and interactive media presentation. To elucidate the main arguments, this paper draws upon a study of digital photography at the nature 'theme park' called the Eden Project, in Cornwall, UK.


Keywords: Theories of Nature and Technology, Scientific and Technological Simulation, Baudrillard, Deleuze, Virilio
Stream: Knowledge and Technology
Presentation Type: Virtual Presentation in English
Paper: A paper has not yet been submitted.


Dr Rob Bartram

Lecturer, Department of Geography, University of Sheffield
UK

Bartram is a Cultural Geographer, having studied for his first degree at University College London Department of Geography, and then for a PhD at the University of Nottingham Department of Geography. His PhD focused on the cultural politics of contemporary heritage movements in Nottingham and London. He is currently a lecturer at the University of Sheffield Department of Geography and has research interests in visual culture, theories of landscape and nature and contemporary art. What combines these diverse research areas is an interest in poststructuralist philosophy and theory, and particularly the works of Gilles Deleuze, Jean Baudrillard and Paul Virilio.


Ref: T05P0145