A Call for a New International Protocol Relating to Aviation Security in Light of Recent Technological and Global Developments Subsequent to 9/11

By:
Prof. Murray Henner
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The Montreal Conventions are woefully inadequate from an international legal perspective. This is particularly true since 9/11 as made evident by a myriad of international security breaches subsequent to that date. The failure by the international community of nations to rely on the Montreal Conventions as a source of internationally accepted law illustrates this patent need. The global communities of sovereign states together with state and privately owned airlines, aircraft manufacturers and others have treated international law addressing aviation security with benign neglect. Culpability lies with international conventions which are replete with ambiguity and to a great extent the result of weak enforcement remedies and the absence of enforcing available technological advances. The skies are not as safe as they could be if the world community could rely on a universal protocol specifically addressing all aspects of international aviation security. Reliance requires potent enforceability provisions requiring accountability. The purpose of this paper is to address the ambiguities contained in the various Montreal Conventions which cry out for remedies and utilization of existing technology. New legislation could fill in the gaps contained in these Conventions. The anticipated result of such a new Convention would likely be "safer skies."


Keywords: Montreal Convention, Security
Stream: Knowledge and Technology
Presentation Type: Workshop Presentation in English
Paper: Call for a New International Protocol Relating to Aviation Security in Light of Recent Technological and Global Developments Subsequent to 9/11, A


Prof. Murray Henner

Global Studies, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University
USA

Author of Several Books and Publications on International Law; Global Studies.


Ref: T05P0211